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Phantom Of The Opera Ends - Longest Running Broadway Show Bids Goodbye

The longest-running Broadway show ever, The Phantom of the Opera ends its run on Sunday after more than 30 years. Since it opened on Broadway in January 1988, almost 14,000 performances of Phantom have been seen by more than 20 million people, bringing in more than $1.3 billion.

James K.
Apr 16, 202318 Shares629 Views
The longest-running Broadway show ever, "The Phantom of the Opera," endsits run on Sunday after more than 30 years. Since it opened on Broadway in January 1988, almost 14,000 performances of Phantom have been seen by more than 20 million people, bringing in more than $1.3 billion.
The production has hired about 6,500 people, including more than 400 actors. It takes 125 people to put on the show, including the cast, orchestra, and crew.

Phantom Of The Opera Ends After 35 Years

"Phantom of the Opera" closing as longest-running Broadway show

The Phantom of the Opera has been running for almost 35 years, but this weekend, the last chandelier will fall at the Majestic Theatre. The hit musical is the longest-running show in the history of Broadway.
In 1988, Andrew Lloyd Webber's play was first shown on Broadway. The show has won seven Tony Awards, including Best Musical the year it opened in the United States.
Mayor Eric Adams gave Webber a key to the city as a tribute to the famous composer's work on Broadway.
Since you unlocked our hearts, we want to give you this key to the greatest city on the globe, New York City, to hang up there with many of the great honors you receive, just thank you so much We are looking atreally the greatest of all time. A true true contributor to Broadway and he keep the lights on in our hearts as we keeps the lights on on Broadway.- Eric Adams
I felt very much a part of the community even though I am British, but I still feel this is the home of musicals and where I want to be, so I'd just like to say thank you, thank you, very, very much. It's something that means a great deal to me.- Andrew Lloyd Webber
One of the most famous musicals in the world, the show has been seen by almost 2 million people and made $1.3 billion. Many people think that Webber is one of the most successful composers in the history of musical theater. He has been nominated for 23 Tony Awards and won six of them.
He has been nominated for more than a dozen Grammy Awards and won three of them. In 1996, he won an Oscar for "You Must Love Me" from the movie Evita.
If you've never seen it, The Phantom of the Opera is about a disfigured genius who haunts the Paris Opera House because he's in love with a young soprano, Christine, who's in love with a handsome count. People die and a chandelier falls on the stage, but love kind of wins in the end. All of this happens to a romantic, sweeping score.
But even the show that has been on Broadway the longest has to end at some point. Even before the pandemic, says Phantom's producer Cameron Mackintosh, the show was already losing money. So, in September of last year, he and Andrew Lloyd Webber set a date for the end.
So, Phantom is going out with a bang, it has been selling out again. David Caddick has been in the music business since the beginning. In 1984, he was the music director for a staged reading on Andrew Lloyd Webber's estate. He is in charge of the last shows on Broadway. Caddick says:
I simply don't know how I'll feel on the morning of the 17th of April. At the moment, it's about maintaining what we have: keeping the show vibrant. I still give notes to the actors, to the orchestra. We will look to maintain every element of the production through to the very last note.- David Caddick

Conclusion

With "The Phantom of the Opera's" ends the last show on Sunday, it will be the longest-running show on Broadway. It has been at the Majestic Theater since 1988, and fans still talk about it. After a rush of ticket sales, the closing date was pushed back by eight weeks. For months, the show has been sold out.
On the last night, only people who were invited or who won tickets in a lottery get to see the moment in Broadway history.
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